Sunday, February 21, 2010

Bollywood forbidden list

Some popular Bollywood actors: Amitabh Bachchan (India's leading actor for decades), Abhishek Bachchan (son of Amitabh, and very talented too), Shahrukh Khan, Hrithik Roshan, Amir Khan, Akshay Kumar, Shahid Kapoor, Vivek Oberoi, Fardeen Khan, Riteish Deshmukh, Akshaye Khanna, Kunal Kapoor, Ajay Devgan, Bobby Deol, Anil Kapoor, Alok Nath & Anupam Kher (two great older actors).
Some popular Bollywood actresses: Aishwarya Rai Bachchan (now married to Abhishek), Preity Zinta (great dimples), Kajol, Rani Mukerji, Madhuri Dixit, Kareena Kapoor, Katrina Kaif, Konkona Sen Sharma, Amisha Patel, Esha Deol, Juhi Chawla, Shilpa Shetty, Bipasha Basu, Jaya Bachchan (Amitabh's wife, Abhishek's mom).
There are two links with lists of both Indian actors and actresses further down this page listed under External Links. In addition, there are lot of websites that cover this subject.

Some more actresses
Amrita Rao
Malika Arora
Amrita Arora (sister of Malika Arora)
Asin
Deepika Pandouke (EX -girlfriend of Ranbir Kapoor)
Katrina Kaif
Preity Zinta
Kareena Kapoor
Bipasha Basu
Shilpa Shetty
Priyanka Chopra
Genila D'souva
Gauri Khan (Not actually a star)

Some more actors
Salman Khan (ex boyfriend of Katrina Kaif and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan before marriage)
Sohail Khan (bro of salman khan)
Imran Khan
Aammir Khan (Uncle of Imran Khan)
Ranbir Kapoor (Cousin of Kareena Kapoor)
Uday Chopra
Harman Baweja (ex boyfriend of priyanka chopra)
Saif Ali Khan (boyfriend of kareena)
Shahid Kapoor (ex-boyfriend of Kareena)
Vivek Oberoi (ex boyfriend of Aishwarya Rai Bachchan before marriage)
John Abraham (Bibasha Basu boyfriend)
Hitrik Roshan
Sharukh Khan (husband of Gauri Khan)

Top ten Bollywood sexy actresses

Bollywood sexy actresses Top ten list

Aishwarya Rai

Kareena Kapoor

Katrina Kaif

Mallika Sherawat

Bipasha Basu

Riya Sen

Amisha Patel

Diya Mirza

Karishma Kapoor

Amrita Rao

Kim Sharma

Rimi Sen

Sameera Reddy

Padmanabham dies


Telugu film comedian Padmanabham, who also produced and directed some Telugu films, has died of heart attack. He was 79.

Padmanabham suffered a heart attack on Saturday morning at his Chennai residence. In the evening, he was pronounced dead by doctors who attended on him.



Basavaraja Venkata Padmanabha Rao, better known as Padmanabham, was born Aug 21, 1931, in Simhadripuram village in Kadapa district. He worked in theatre before he was introduced in films.

His death comes a few days after another character actor, Gummadi Venkateshwara Rao, passed away.

Padmanabhan got a break in films through “Krishna Prema” in 1943. He gained prominence after acting in “Maya Lokam,” directed by Gudavalli Ramabrahmam.

He acted in almost 400 movies, including many superhits like “Pathala Bhairvai” and “Bhadra,” released in 2005. His last film was “Tata Birla Madyalo Laila,” which was released in 2006.

He was very popular as a comedy artiste for almost two decades from 1960 to 1980.

Padmanabham produced many films, including “Sri Sri Maryada Ramanna”, “Potti Pleaderu”. His major hits include “Shavukaru”, “Patala Bhairavi”, “Paramanandayya Sishyula Katha”, “Kathanayika Molla”, “Dasara Bullodu”, “Iddaru Mitrulu”.

He won the Andhra Pradesh government’s award for best comedian and the prestigious Allu Ramalingaiah National Award.

Padmanabham dies

Telugu film comedian Padmanabham, who also produced and directed some Telugu films, has died of heart attack. He was 79.

Padmanabham suffered a heart attack on Saturday morning at his Chennai residence. In the evening, he was pronounced dead by doctors who attended on him.

Basavaraja Venkata Padmanabha Rao, better known as Padmanabham, was born Aug 21, 1931, in Simhadripuram village in Kadapa district. He worked in theatre before he was introduced in films.

His death comes a few days after another character actor, Gummadi Venkateshwara Rao, passed away.

Padmanabhan got a break in films through “Krishna Prema” in 1943. He gained prominence after acting in “Maya Lokam,” directed by Gudavalli Ramabrahmam.

He acted in almost 400 movies, including many superhits like “Pathala Bhairvai” and “Bhadra,” released in 2005. His last film was “Tata Birla Madyalo Laila,” which was released in 2006.

He was very popular as a comedy artiste for almost two decades from 1960 to 1980.

Padmanabham produced many films, including “Sri Sri Maryada Ramanna”, “Potti Pleaderu”. His major hits include “Shavukaru”, “Patala Bhairavi”, “Paramanandayya Sishyula Katha”, “Kathanayika Molla”, “Dasara Bullodu”, “Iddaru Mitrulu”.

He won the Andhra Pradesh government’s award for best comedian and the prestigious Allu Ramalingaiah National Award.

Amitabh demands apology from tabloid

Actor Amitabh Bachchan has demanded an apology from Mumbai Mirror, a city-based tabloid, for printing a story alleging that Aishwarya Rai Bachchan had “stomach tuberculosis” and asked for a donation to a national charitable foundation working for tuberculosis.

He has demanded, through his blog, an apology for the “defamatory” article.

The actor also posted on his blog a letter written on Thursday by Ms. Bachchan to the tabloid asking for a denial and an apology which the tabloid printed. “Do note that the last few lines of the letter seeking apology have been conveniently deleted in the print.”

Salman Khan kickstarts Mumbai Cyclothon

Bollywood Actor Salman Khan is busy cycling across Bandra in Mumbai on Sunday as he kickstarts the Mumbai Cyclothon. It is being promoted by the foundation called Being Human, which is the Salman Khan Foundation, to encourage the practice of cycling in the city.

S.Africa send India in to bat in first one-dayer

(AFP) – 4 hours ago

JAIPUR, India — South Africa's stand-in captain Jacques Kallis won the toss and sent India in to bat in the first one-day international at the Sawai Man Singh stadium in Jaipur on Sunday.

India were without bowling spearheads Zaheer Khan and Harbhajan Singh, and frontline batsmen Gautam Gambhir and Yuvraj Singh, for the opening game of the three-match series.

Harbhajan was given permission to miss the first two matches due to his sister's wedding, while the other three were injured.

South African captain Graeme Smith opted out of the one-dayers with a finger injury sustained during the Test series, which ended 1-1 last week.

India: Mahendra Singh Dhoni (capt), Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Virat Kohli, Suresh Raina, Dinesh Karthik, Yusuf Pathan, Praveen Kumar, Ashish Nehra, Shanthakumaran Sreesanth, Ravindra Jadeja.

South Africa: Jacques Kallis (capt), Herschelle Gibbs, Loots Bosman, AB de Villiers, Alviro Petersen, Johan Botha, Mark Boucher, Charl Langeveldt, Albie Morkel, Wayne Parnell, Dale Steyn.

Umpires: Ian Gould (ENG) and Amiesh Saheba (IND)

TV umpire: Sanjay Hazare (IND)

Match referee: Andy Pycroft (ZIM)

Saturday, February 20, 2010

Aptharakshaka by Vishnuvardhan phenomenon

Movie lovers who went out on Friday to catch Vishnuvardhan's posthumously released film Aptharakshaka (Bodyguard) were treated to sweets and a free lunch. Excitement about the film peaked to star-crazy 1980s levels, leaving new Bangaloreans stunned.


“I've never seen anything like this anywhere,” said Punyasloka, a techie from Orissa, now a resident of Bangalore. Fans washed cut-outs with milk, broke coconuts, carried huge paper-crafted stars, and bought tickets in black. Some paid Rs 3,000 a ticket to watch the film first day, first show.

After the advent of multiplexes, such old-fashioned enthusiasm had almost vanished from Bangalore. What fans had missed for over a decade made a grand comeback on Friday.

A fan pours milk on a Vishnuvardhan cut-out at Uma theatre
SWEET DAY
In all 28 cinema halls where the film is being screened in Bangalore, fans went around distributing sweets to everyone.
Aptharakshaka, completed just before Vishnuvardhan's death on December 30 last year, is a sequel to Apthamitra, his last big hit released five years ago.

At Narthaki cinema near Majestic, fans gave away lunch packets to the audience. At Uma in Chamarajpet, fans poured 101 litres of milk on the actor's cut-out.

At Siddalingeshwara, fans went a step further and poured curds, honey and milk on Vishnuvardhan cut-outs.

BOOK GIFTS
Fan groups gave away books to school children. They plan folk dances and mobile orchestras over the weekend. Incredibly, touts found buyers willing to buy tickets at Rs 3,000 each.

“The dedicated fan following for a hero grows with the number of films of that actor. But after the 1980s, when fans of Rajkumar, Vishnuvardhan and Ambareesh would compete to celebrate a film's release, the mania had diminished,” says B N Subramanya, film critic.

In recent years only Puneeth Rajkumar and Darshan films have provoked fan frenzy. But the reaction of fans to Aptharakshaka is like in the old days.

A brisk sale of a book on Vishnuvardhan, ‘Vishnu — Noorondu Nenapu,’ (Vishnu — Hundreds of Memories) was also seen near cinema halls. "Film lovers read," said the book's author Sadashiva Shenoy.

But not everyone was impressed. Ganesh Kasargod, veteran film critic, said, “The film looks more like a sequel to the Telugu film Arundhati than to Apthamitra. Frankly, I was disappointed with Aptharakshaka.”

A S Murthy, another critic, said, “Innovation in mainstream films had vanished. Apthamitra comes as a stroke of good luck. It can become a very big hit. It is a fitting last film.”

Ravishankar, lecturer at VVS Institute of Management and Sciences, said, “The old man's role Vishnuvardhan plays in the film is probably something no other actor can match. The three voices he has spoken in is unbelievable. If anybody thinks this film will run just because of grief and sympathy after this death, admirers like me will be hurt.”

Ticket for 42 times its price
Many complain multiplex tickets are costly. But the black rates for first-day first-show tickets of Aptharakshaka beat the multiplexes hollow. At Rs 3,000 a ticket near Narthaki cinema, the film beat all records in Bangalore.

Last year, the Telugu film Magadheera created a sensation in Bangalore, and tickets in the black market sold at Rs 800 each. Before that it was Rajinikanth's Tamil film Shivaji which made touts happier than the producers.

Tickets for Shivaji were sold for up to Rs 1,000. The balcony ticket rate at Narthaki is Rs 70. At 3,000 it has sold itself at 42 times its price.

Nagavalli lives on
Aptharakshaka is a sequel to the 2004 film Apthamitra, a remake of the 1993 Malayalam film Manichithrathazhu. The huge success of Apthamitra saw it being remade in Tamil and Telugu with Rajinikanth (Chandramukhi) and even Hindi (Bhool Bhulaiya).

Aptharakshaka is an original in Kannada, and is both a sequel and a prequel to Apthamitra. The story chronicles the struggles of a psychiatrist and a swamiji to help a family supposedly affected by the ghost of a long dead royal dancer, Nagavalli.

Aptharakshaka also talks about the legend of Nagavalli and a king obsessed with her.

Two few: Test cricket deserves better

Now that India finish the (financial) year as the number one Test team in the world, don’t be surprised if the various members of the Board of Control for Cricket in India are taking time off to update their bio-data. “It was when I was President (or secretary or vice president or whatever) that India became the best team in the world,” we can imagine them writing, and no matter if the politics within the Board has ensured that Tests are thrust upon venues that have no interest in watching them.


Not all the lessons from the surprisingly poorly-hyped South Africa series came from the field of play. It was good to see Harbhajan Singh return to his confident match-winning ways, and to see Mahendra Singh Dhoni (despite being defensive occasionally) marshal his limited bowling attack on the final day in Kolkata. With just three bowlers at his command, Dhoni rotated them well enough for victory with just a few deliveries remaining.

But I suspect that if the situation had been similar in the first Test at Nagpur, South Africa might have got away with a draw. The determination of Hashim Amla’s face (and his bat was as broad as his heart) was something to see.

What pushed Harbhajan on a still decent track was as much his own self-belief (bolstered, as the bowler admitted later, by a pep talk from his old colleague Anil Kumble) as the vociferous and unstinted support from a packed Eden Gardens stadium. It might have only been some forty thousand or so as the stadium is being renovated for the World Cup, but such support puts a spring in the bowler’s step, and – dare I say it – an extra spin on the ball.

Kolkata have taken Harbhajan to heart in the manner they did Mohammad Azharuddin earlier and Gundappa Vishwanath and B S Chandrasekhar before that. Not enough research has been done on the way a crowd energises a performer, but empirical evidence suggests that crowd support is a crucial element in taking a bowler or batsman that extra yard. You only have to look at the statistics of the above players at Eden Gardens. Harbhajan’s victory lap after the last wicket was to pay a tribute to the extra bowler in the Indian team – the Kolkata crowd.

And that is why it wouldn’t have happened in Nagpur where empty stands greeted the players. In fact, it must be depressing for a home side to get no home support. And the question that asks itself naturally is, why Nagpur at all? Or Ahmedabad? Or anywhere that India have played Test cricket watched by three spectators and a dog?

That is where Board politics come in. Kolkata haven’t hosted a Test since 2007 because the Cricket Association of Bengal belongs to the wrong column in the Board arithmetic. Chennai, which has seen some great Tests, some great crowds, and a wonderfully festive atmosphere during Pongal in mid-January, hasn’t had a Pongal Test since 1988 (and only ten Tests since). That means a whole generation has grown up without the faintest idea of the Pongal Test tradition. As former captain Venkatraghavan used to say, “Pongal was synonymous with Test cricket” in Chennai.

So why does the Board insist on thrusting Test cricket down the throats of centres which would rather have one-day or Twenty20 matches? Test matches have been played on 20 grounds in India, so obviously a certain amount of give-and-take is necessary. The Board could lay down guidelines: poor crowds and you lose your status as a Test venue. This will help the spectators too since there might be an effort to bring down the often exorbitant price of tickets to pack in the crowds.

Kolkata, Chennai and Bangalore and possibly Mumbai guarantee crowds and knowledgeable ones at that. Test cricket is about tradition, not politics. The so-called rotation policy ought to be restricted to those outside these venues.

There is also the question of the ridiculous two-match series. Between top teams this ought to be banned. Even if the current series was arranged hurriedly to take advantage of India’s new status at the top of the table, it left everybody unfulfilled. Two fine matches, and just when the series was beginning to hit its stride, it is all over. Test cricket deserves better – especially since Kolkata has shown that it is alive and well in India, if only you know where to look. And the authorities show some sense.

Students, police clash on Osmania campus

HYDERABAD: The situation in the State capital turned volatile after a pro-Telangana activist immolated himself in full public view near the Osmania University campus after police foiled the attempts of agitating students to march to the Andhra Pradesh Assembly on Saturday morning.

The self-immolation bid sparked confrontations between the students and the police at several places throughout the day. See-saw battles and stone-pelting continued till late in the evening on the University campus – the nerve centre of the pro-Telangana stir.
In critical condition

The grievously burnt youngster, identified as Siripuram Yadagiri (19) of Maheshwaram mandal in Rangareddy district, was rushed to the Apollo Hospital near DRDL. His condition was stated to be critical.

Incensed students engaged the police in pitched battles as they spilled out onto the Tarnaka-Habsiguda road by evening. They ignored tear gas shells and even stun grenades while hurling stones on police forces at Ground ‘A’ behind the RTC hospital near Tarnaka. Several policemen were injured in the stone-pelting.

Authorities had deployed 30,000 policemen for security arrangements in view of the students’ call to lay siege to the Assembly and virtually took control of central Hyderabad. The innumerable road blockades set up by the police and restrictions on the movement of people led to a curfew-like situation.
Surprise act

The students, who tried to take out a procession, jostled with policemen who formed several layers of human chain to prevent them from proceeding ahead. The situation appeared to be normal as the Assembly adjourned around 1 p.m. and agitators returned to the campus.

However, taking everyone by surprise, Yadagiri who was watching the police-student confrontation, doused himself with kerosene or petrol, set fire to himself and ran towards the policemen around 1.40 p.m.
Campus inflamed

As shocked policemen rushed towards him, Yadagiri, who was engulfed in flames, ran for about 50 metres. Policemen used their bamboo body vests to put out the flames.

The immolation bid inflamed the campus and thousands of students began fighting pitched battles with the police.

Elsewhere, students attempted to break through police cordons to reach the Assembly at PG Colleges in Secunderabad and Saifabad and at Nizam College hostel in Basheerbagh forcing police to use their canes repeatedly.

In the Assembly, Chief Minister K. Rosaiah presented a Rs. 1.13 lakh crore annual budget for 2010-11, a marginal increase over last year’s outlay.

The budget was tax-free since the government had raised additional revenue of nearly Rs. 6,000 crore through pre-budget imposts.

Referring to the turbulence in the State, the Chief Minister said Andhra Pradesh would have registered a higher growth rate but for the disturbances.

He said he had kept in mind the interests of all regions while formulating the budget proposals.

Did SRK tweets help end MNIK standoff with Shiv Sena?

NEW DELHI: The showdown between actor Shahrukh Khan and Shiv Sena boss Bal Thackeray over "My Name Is Khan" was sorted out not only through tough police action but also back-channel contacts with the Sena's "first family" once the pressure tactics were applied.

The "negotiations" over MNIK almost broke down with SRK's agreement to state his "regrets" to anyone hurt by his remarks on Pakistani players in IPL was conveyed to Thackeray in a manner that it did not amount to an "apology". But a carefully worked out script with the star steering well clear of any apology finally passed muster.

Sources familiar with the MNIK developments said SRK's tweets from Berlin which were playing out on TV were being monitored by the Sena leadership. The party's executive president, Uddhav Thackeray, was approached to cease hostilities and his son Aditya followed the comments on Twitter. It was argued that the actor would offer a generalised regret to anyone who felt hurt.

The star was reportedly ready to make some other references which were accepted by the Sena. With both sides keen to end the impasse, the Sena was ready to declare victory and back off.

The Sena was also caught in a bind with pressure being exerted by the Maharashtra government which rounded up its cadres. There was no intervention by Congress's top leadership but senior functionaries did ask chief minister Ashok Chavan to take adequate measures.

Though SRK and the film's producer-director Karan Johar did not trek to the Thackeray residence of Matoshree, there were numerous discreet exhanges between them and the Sena. SRK had no objections to issuing tweets about his love and regard for Mumbai but had made it plain that he did not consider remarks on IPL to be objectionable.

It was conveyed to the Thackerays that the film's producer and actor were not interested in any confrontation. The IPL episode was over and they would like to get on with MNIK's release in Maharashtra. There was considerable uncertainty over the film given the unwillingness of exhibitors to risk any violence. Mumbai was the biggest territory and the likely revenue to be affected ran into Rs 30-40 crore.